Tag Archives: Paul Doherty

A Pilgrimage to Murder

5 Mar

I got my copy of “A Pilgrimage to Murder” by Paul Doherty from the library on Friday and sat down on Friday evening and read it straight through.

The Great Rebellion is over, and Brother Athelstan, Sir Jack Cranston, and many of Athelstan’s parishioners are going on pilgrimage to Canterbury.

Naturally, nothing goes to plan.  Clerks from the Secret Chancery are being murdered.  At the same time, John of Gaunt is maneuvering to claim the throne of Castile by right of both his marriage to Constanzia of Castile and his descent from Eleanor of Castile.

John of Gaunt’s right hand man, Thibault, joins the pilgrimage to meet up with representatives from Castile to discuss his master’s claim.

To add to the turmoil, someone is threatening Athelstan’s life, and this time the threats are serious.

“A Pilgrimage to Murder” is an excellent book.  The characters only get as far of the first night’s stop before all hell breaks loose.

Well written, exciting, with lots of clues to help you spot the killer.  A delicious addition to the series.

I am looking forward to the continuation of the pilgrimage, because you never know who they might meet, such as Geoffrey Chaucer… or his characters from the Canterbury Tales, or, indeed, the more rounded version of the characters from Paul’s own take on the Canterbury Tales.

The Great Revolt

13 Jun

“The Great Revolt” by Paul Doherty is the latest in the Brother Athelstan series of mysteries.

It has finally come… the Peasant’s Revolt has reached London.  John of Gaunt has gone north, ostensibly to go to war against Scotland, leaving London and Richard II undefended.  Sir Jack Cranston is at the young king’s side, and Athelstan is in the midst of turmoil again.

This time someone has murdered a member of the community at the Dominican house at Blackfriars.  Athelstan is called back to Blackfrairs to find the killer, and to act as Devil’s Advocate in the matter of the possible beatification/cannonisation of Edward II.  Meanwhile, London is burning around them, and someone has abducted the men of the parish of St Erconwalds!

“The Great Revolt” is the culmination of the massive story arc that Paul has been writing for damn near 20 years.

Prior Anslem, who has been a minor presence in a few of the books, has a fairly major role this time.  The character proved to be very likeable and I hope we see more of him in future Athelstan books.

I have read a lot of books about the Peasant’s Revolt.  Both fiction and non fiction.  But this book is the only one that has made me see the destruction, and feel the misery and terror welling around it.  As Athelstan, Jack Cranston, and Benedicta venture around both the City and Southwark, you get to see through their eyes the devastation, and murder, that was visited on the people.

If you read one novel about the Peasant’s Revolt this year, make it this one.  The intensity and depth are incredible.

Highly recommended.

The Herald of Hell

26 Nov

“The Herald of Hell” is the best Paul Doherty novel in ages.

The plot takes place literally days before the Great Revolt of 1381.  So the atmosphere of the book is one of danger and fear.

A clerk from the secret chancery of John of Gaunt is murdered in a brothel. His servant seeks sanctuary at St Erconwalds and is also murdered.  All hell is breaking loose and only Sir Jack Cranston and Brother Athelstan stand in its path.

Well written, fast paced, and damn near unputdownable.  “The Herald of Hell” had me on the edge of my seat many times.

As always, Paul loves his little inside jokes.  He ties the first Hugh Corbett novel, “Satan in St Marys” into the framework of this book.  And, as is his wont, his home town gets a mention.  I think he’s worked it into just about every novel he’s written.

The next book in the series is apparently going to be called “The Great Revolt”, we know how it ends, but I am sure we will loose many of Athelstan’s parishioners before that book ends.  But suffice to say that, in this book, we don’t loose anyone we have come to love, but there is at least one hell of a shock for long time readers of the series.

Highly recommended.  Fantastic book.

Roseblood

22 Jul

Set in 1455 at the dawn of what history calls the War of the Roses, or, more accurately, the Cousins War, “Roseblood” is a bit of a change for Paul Doherty.  It isn’t really a mystery, what is truly is is a medieval political thriller.

Simon Roseblood is a taverner, alderman, career criminal, and loyal servant of the House of Lancaster.  Amadeus Sevigny is a clerk indentured to Richard, Duke of York, leading light of the House of York.

Amadeus’ masters want Simon Roseblood bought down, but as a much larger threat looms over both houses, Amadeus and Simon join forces to protect England and themselves, regardless of personal allegiances.

There are a lot of plot threads in this book, and I admit that at times I got very lost and very confused.  Mostly, I think, because I was expecting a murder mystery, when the book really is a political thriller.  Each type of book really needs a different mindset when reading.  Frankly, I was in the wrong headspace when I started the book.

This is certainly one of the best books Paul Doherty has written in a while.

It stands alone, but Paul has ended it so that it is possible that it may be continued further into the War of the Roses.

“Roseblood” has interesting and engaging original characters, and his take on historical characters is fascinating.  

I highly recommend it.

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